Monday, September 19, 2011

Win a copy of John Huston: Courage and Art

UPDATE: Kurt won and should have received an email from me.



Here's the official description of John Huston: Courage and Art by Jeffrey Meyers:

An actor in the 1920s and scriptwriter in the 1930s, John Huston made his dazzling directorial debut in 1941 with The Maltese Falcon. His career as a filmmaker spanned some fifty-seven years and yielded thirty-seven feature films. He made most of his movies abroad, spent much of his life in Ireland and Mexico, and remains one of the most intelligent and influential filmmakers in history. With equal attention given to Huston’s impressive artistic output and tempestuous personal relationships, biographer Jeffrey Meyers presents a vivid narrative of Huston’s remarkably rich creative life.

The son of the famous stage and screen actor Walter Huston, John Huston was born in Nevada City, Missouri, and suffered from a weak heart that forced him to live as an invalid for much of his childhood. One day, however, he impulsively left his sickbed, dove over a waterfall, swam into a raging river and began to lead a strenuous life. He became an expert sportsman as well as a boxer, bullfighter, hunter, soldier, gambler and adventurer. Though he didn’t finish high school, he was a man of true genius: a serious painter and amusing raconteur, playwright and story writer, stage and screen actor, director of plays on Broadway and operas at La Scala, autobiographer and political activist who crusaded against Senator Joseph McCarthy’s anticommunist witch hunts in Hollywood. He was a discerning collector of art and connoisseur of literature, food and wine. Passionate about horses and women, he had five successively younger wives.

Meyers chronicles Huston’s extraordinarily peripatetic life and examines his rise as a great masculine artist in the formidable tradition of Melville, Conrad and Hemingway, whose persona, ethos, prose style and virile code had a powerful influence on his life and work. Thirty-four of Huston’s thirty-seven films adapted important novels, stories and plays, and Meyers perceptively describes how Huston brilliantly transformed the written word into the cinematic image. Huston’s dominant theme is the almost impossible quest, tempered by detachment and irony. His heroes sacrifice honor in pursuit of wealth but fail in that venture, are mocked by cruel fate and remain defiant in the face of defeat. Based on research in Huston’s personal and professional archives, and interviews with his children, friends and colleagues, this is the dramatic story of a courageous artist who, Meyers persuasively argues, is “one of the most fascinating men who ever lived.”
The Washington Post says it's "very good." You can preorder it at Amazon.

I have a copy to give away. For a chance to win, comment on this post, and make sure your comment includes your email. One entry per person, and I apologize, but this contest is limited to USA residents. I'll pick a winner on Wednesday.

16 comments:

  1. The future, Mr. Gittes, the FUTURE.. 16timesaweek@gmail.com

    Please pick me

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  2. I want to draw comparisons to Jim Harrison, or Audwin McGee, but damn I want to read this book. jebgavin@gmail.com

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  3. I had a brief encounter with Mr. Huston in a store in Westwood. He was in a wheelchair being pushed around by a gorgeous woman. He was gracious and pleased that some kid knew who he was and was honestly interested. We were interrupted by the store owner and he had to run for cover from over the over zealous owner. As he was rolling out the door he flashed me the greatest smile and look of apology for leaving our conversation. I will always have a huge soft spot for Mr. Huston. One of my heroes.
    Please enter me in the running for this book. Kurt Kress lionsgate3@cox.net

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  4. I did not know that The Maltese Falcon was his -first- movie. How on earth did he get that kind of a cast lined up to work with a first-time director? Amazing.
    exactwords at gmail dot com

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  5. I highly recommend the following, based on a short story Ray Bradbury wrote in a fit of anger over Huston's behavior during Moby Dick, after reading it Huston apologized. Starring O'Toole as Huston himself

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIXPSRPS0O8

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  6. As a young aspiring screenwriter, I would absolutely love to peer inside the world of the great Jon Huston. Learning his legacy might help inspire and light my creative fire. RGCasanova91@gmail.com

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  7. I love your blog. Thank you for giving us such interesting things to read and for keeping us entertained. BYFloyd@gmail.com

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  8. Woot! Woot! darren.m.bradley@gmail.com

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  9. One of the great storytellers in any medium, Huston's movies are deeply moving. Thank you for the head's up on this forthcoming book.

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  10. http://i.imgur.com/ce3gA.gif Cormac.mcevy@gmail.com

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  11. Yea! btw-Love your blog
    blbelcher@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  12. I likes to look at them words. clevetheripper at gmail dot com

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  13. This would make a perfect gift for a certain screenwriting-interested person I know.

    stickstickstick AT gmail DOT com

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  14. Looks like a great book! Thanks for hosting this giveaway!

    wings1295 @ gmail . com

    ReplyDelete