Tuesday, April 29, 2008

Slices of the world




Made by Studio Psyho for a travel agency called Madagascar.

Thursday, April 24, 2008

Monday, April 14, 2008

Friday, April 11, 2008

Michael Chabon's full script for Spider-Man 2

You can download a pdf of the whole thing here. McSweeney's posted it to promote Chabon's new book Maps and Legends.

Thursday, April 10, 2008

Plot Idea of the Day: Man's home has been hit by meteorites five times

A Bosnian man whose home has been hit an incredible five times by meteorites believes he is being targeted by aliens.

Experts at Belgrade University have confirmed that all the rocks Radivoje Lajic has handed over were meteorites.

They are now investigating local magnetic fields to try and work out what makes the property so attractive to the heavenly bodies.

Link. Via.

Monday, April 7, 2008

Ewok prototype action figures



One of several prints of vintage Star Wars toys available here.

Friday, April 4, 2008

Armed men steal Buddhist monk's body

"A group of armed men on Wednesday stole the body of one of Myanmar's most revered Buddhist monks, whose corpse has been preserved in a glass coffin since he died more than four years ago." Link.

Glowing full moon cabinet




Produced by ENNEZERO and designed by Sotirios Papadopoulos. More information here. Via.

Thursday, April 3, 2008

How Vegas makes its money

Whales, in the language of Las Vegas, are, Adelson says, those who can win or lose $3 million in one stay. There are only a few thousand whales in the world, but they are multiplying fast in China -- thank you, the People's Republic. Adelson says that when 60,000 people a day are gambling at Macao's Venetian, 40 percent of the casino's revenues come from 59,700 of them, and 60 percent from 300 others, probably including three to eight whales. In the Venetian here, 20 percent of the gamblers provide 80 percent of the revenues.

Link.

Tuesday, April 1, 2008

There's plenty of ivory in Russia

NOVY URENGOI, Russia — As Viktor Seliverstov works in his makeshift studio in this Siberian town, he is enveloped in a cloud of ivory dust. His electric carving tool whirs over the milky surface of the teeth and tusks, as he whittles them into key fobs, knife handles and scrimshaw figurines.

But these are not whale bones or walrus tusks he is working on. The ivory in this part of the world comes from the remains of extinct woolly mammoths, as their remains emerge from the tundra where they have been frozen for thousands of years. It is a traditional Russian business that had all but gone extinct itself during the Soviet period, but is flourishing now.

Keep reading.